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Archive for the ‘video’ Category

A real-life lesson in digital citizenship happened recently. Our wonderful physical education teachers have an annual event with third and fourth grade classes. For two weeks, students learn a dance, choreographed and taught to them by middle school students. It’s usually set to popular music, which is incredibly motivating and engaging.

To culminate the learning, there’s an annual Dance-A-Rama, where all of the classes present their dance to one another. As a surprise at the end, (though since we’ve been doing this for about 6 years now, it can’t be a surprise anymore), most of the classroom teachers, student teachers, and other adults present a dance they’ve learned to the students. Oh, and did I mention there are judges, like American Idol? They’re also adults from the school, dressed up and acting the role of pop stars.

BLOCKED!I was asked to help record the event on video. Here’s where it gets interesting. Over the years, I have explored many different ways to record and stream video. We now live stream the annual faculty-student basketball game, PTO meetings, special events, and 8th grade graduation in June. This time I decided to stream it via YouTube Live, so that we could access the video easily afterward.

All went well, until the afterward part. It saved the video beautifully. However, due to the popular songs used for the dances, YouTube blocked it. Most of the songs were monetized, which meant there would be ads on the video. That’s not a problem. But one song was totally blocked in the USA and 7 other countries. I was the only one who could see it!

I tried to download it, but that feature wasn’t available due to never having uploaded it. The video was generated from a live stream. I tried to appeal some of the copyright issues, but was denied. I was ready to throw up my hands and admit defeat.

In the midst of this, I put out a tweet about my predicament. One response was from someone here in Vermont who I have not yet had the pleasure of meeting. Tom (@ACSD_edtech) offered a website where I should have been able to paste the YouTube link and download it,  but that didn’t work. The next thing I knew, he contacted me with a link to the downloaded video saved in Google Drive. Yay!

He sent a tweet saying this: “I used a VPN pinged off another country. It let me watch the video. Once I could do that, I could download it.” That was beyond my knowledge, but it worked and now we’ve been able to share the video internally.

Lessons learned:

  • Classroom teachers are using this as a real-life lesson to help students learn about copyright and music.
  • We will use a different route for live-streaming if there’s going to be music playing on the video, unless we compose the music! YouTube is amazingly powerful and easily catches popular music.
  • YouTube Live was great for streaming.
  • For me, it’s a real-life example of the power of my PLN. I was so impressed by how Tom used his own time to help me solve a problem. We’ll meet at a local conference in a few weeks where I can thank him in person.

I’m not putting the video here as a nod to the privacy of our students and teachers, and respecting the copyright of the music. But it is great that we can share it internally.

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Our use of green screen technology with video is expanding every day. We currently have a green screen set up (screen and lighting) in each of our two buildings, with more on the way. Teachers are excited to incorporate this into their programs to enhance and support learning.

Last fall, 8 educators from our schools gave up their own time to attend a green screen workshop offered one evening by RETN. (Regional Educational Television Network). The amazing facilitators,  Doug Dunbebin and Jill Dawson (@Switchback42), made a lasting impression on our teachers and from them to our students.

New videos featuring green screen technology have been created as a direct result of this workshop. The videos range from sharing about a field trip at the first/second grade level, to creating PSAs about Child Labor at the middle school level. There are more projects in the works as well and other teachers are joining in.

Thank you to RETN and Jill. Doug’s legacy lives on.

 

 

 

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