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Posts Tagged ‘blogging’

As I’ve written about before; I tend to go in cycles with my blog. I want to blog regularly, but that just doesn’t seem to happen consistently. I am great at joining challenges to get on the right track, but once they end, my dedication to my blog ends too. I have great intentions, and there are no acceptable excuses. I value the idea of blogging professionally and know how important it is for me to share and reflect to a larger audience.

The ISTE EdTech Coaches Network set up Blogging Buddies. I’ve joined in and have 4 other buddies in my group at this time. We are ‘Group 9’ and will be working on a new name for the group soon. I intend to comment on their blogs and hope they will on mine as well.

So hats off to my new ‘team’. Follow them and their blogs as well. hats off.png

@smussle  http://musslebytes.blogspot.com

@christinahum44  http://techthroughtime.blogspot.com/

@mikephillipsms  http://mikephillipsms.blogspot.com/

@JSMercado  http://iheartteachingkids.blogspot.com/

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This week’s #ETCoaches blog challengeHow do you plan to keep blogging? Do you have a frequency in mind? Another challenge to share? Did you find an editorial calendar for planning?

This challenge has been great in that it helped me focus once again on my blog. I liked the frequency; blogging once a week was do-able. I participated in another challenge a few years ago that was a daily challenge and that proved to be, well, challenging. I also liked connecting with some of the other ETCoaches who participated.

1471150324_a52068a957_zSo you are all witnesses to my new commitment. I will blog once a week, at least. I have been using Google Keep more and will jot down my ideas for blog posts on a note there. Sometimes it’s obvious what I can blog about, but other times I need a push, reminder, or suggestion.

As I stated in my initial post for this challenge, I don’t want to blog just for the sake of blogging. I want to stay positive. With all of the many things that occur in the course of our work as educators, there’s always something we could gripe about, but that’s not the purpose of my blog. And timely as ever, Richard Byrne shared a post this weekend about the goals of blogs. From that post, I connect with the last two goals – Encouraging others to write, and Helping other teachers/educators.

I am not going to pursue another challenge right now. Focusing on what’s happening in the schools in which I work, and on work that I am doing seem more authentic and important for me at this juncture.

Thanks for reading. Please help me stick to it!

 

Image Credit: via Carmelo Fernando Creative Commons/Flickr https://flic.kr/p/3f12JL

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Recharging My Blog

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As I’ve said in the past, sometimes I need structure to keep me on track. I have had so many ideas for blog posts during the summer and already at the beginning of this school year, but alas, the time has slipped away. I’m embarrassed that it’s been so long since I posted.

Then, on Twitter recently, I came across the #ETCoaches Blog Challenge. Just what I needed to get back in the swing of things. Thank you to whomever is behind that!

My first post for the challenge – share the purpose of my blog. That’s a fabulous prompt as it truly causes me to reflect on why I have this blog.

Reasons for my blog and why I blog: 

  • Obviously, to reflect on my practice, which always help me learn and grow
  • To share great things happening in the schools in which I work
  • To help make connections with others
  • To stay positive (I don’t use my blog to rant and neither should you)
  • To help tell my story and that of our schools
  • To encourage others to blog, share, and get connected

I plan to continue with this Challenge, but will also get my readers caught up on what I’ve been up to since I last posted. Stay tuned and as always, feel free to comment and connect!

image credit: CreativeCommons flickr, kev-shine https://flic.kr/p/b3jjdD 

 

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As is the case for many of us, having structure helps. By that I mean having clear, regular expectations for yourself, whether it’s self-imposed or provided by an outside source. I know that if I don’t have a regular routine or someone waiting for me, I don’t exercise as often. Yes, I just confessed that. I need structure and I know it. That may not be the case for all who have different drivers motivating them to do many things.

Last year I participated in the #reflectiveteacher (check out that hashtag!) 30-Day Blogging Challenge, sponsored by TeachThought. I blogged every day for a month! My goal was to set the ball in motion and then I’d easily blog on a regular basis after the challenge ended. As you can see by the dates on my posts, that fell to the wayside.

Its-possible-to-becomeA colleague from Vermont (@betavt) created a Twitter challenge to encourage people in his district to tweet and connect with one another at the beginning of this school year. I watched it from afar to see how it went. Then, with permission, I borrowed and adapted the idea. We are using it to tweet from our school, using the #wsdvt hashtag as a part of our work for Connected Educator’s month. There are a few educators in our schools who have joined in, but not as many as I would have predicted. I wonder why? There’s great structure!

Also as a part of Connected Educator’s month, Lani Ritter Hall (@lanihall) is posting a Daily Connect on the Connected Educator’s ning. It’s a quick activity which exposes us to a new tool, encourages us to try it out and share it, and then use it to connect with others. Today’s Daily Connect encouraged us to use AnswerGarden. I’m learning something new every day.

I’m responding well to the structure of these two activities and have tweeted each day as well as tried Lani’s Daily Challenge. I find that having structure helps direct my learning. Hmmm, it’s likely the same for many of our students as learners, as well as for our colleagues. I’m encouraged to suggest to teachers and students that they create challenges like these to engage and provide structure for learning, for others.

And look, without any structure, I’m blogging. Maybe I have grown!

image created with Quozio.com

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I’ve had a few experiences lately where I’ve been so impressed with what’s happening at the primary level. By that, I mean grades K-2, but this is certainly prevalent at other levels as well.

I taught some courses this summer and had the privilege of working with teachers at all levels. Recently, teachers from two different courses, who teach at the primary level, have had things to share with me.

One course was all about integrating Google tools. During our week together, a few teachers and I got to talking about Twitter. Yes, not a Google tool, but still a powerful one. They wanted to hear more about how to use Twitter to make classroom connections. I continued the conversation with one teacher beyond our summer work. Last week, she came to visit one of our kindergarten classes, Sharon Davison‘s (@kkidsinvt), and watched the class use Twitter to share with other kindergarten classes (class account: @vermontkkids123). Our guest, a first grade teacher, also has explored the #1stchat hashtag and has lurked in a Twitter chat as well. She is overcome by the sheer numbers of primary educators that are out there sharing and connecting. Her visit to our school helped her get underway.

bloggingAnother summer course was about the integration of writing and digital tools. All of the participants in that one are primary teachers, plus one principal. Two of the teachers, who teach in our district but another school, have added blogging with their students to the vast array of things teachers are responsible for these days. They approached it systematically by paper-blogging and paper-commenting, leading up to using the technology for those tasks. The second grade teacher got things underway with her students and they blogged a few times and left one another comments. The teacher was thrilled and set up a future session with her colleague, who teaches first grade. Today, the second graders taught the first graders how to access and create their blog posts. I was invited to observe and help out. They didn’t need my help- these students were ALL engaged and on task. They all felt successful and the first posts by first graders were a huge hit.

I got back to my school and walked into a computer lab filled with a first/second grade class (multi-age). They also were blogging! The teacher was so excited at how well things were going, how easily the students were navigating Kidblog, and how many skills are embedded in the experience. She is eager to try to help more of her colleague see the light.

Finally, one of our third/fourth grade classes (multi-age) has been participating in the Global Read Aloud author study of Peter Reynolds’ books. They’ve been blogging about his books and including some amazing reflections. They have also learned a lot about commenting – from penny comments to dollar comments, as well as highway and dead-end comments. The teacher used the Global Read Aloud hashtag #grapeter to share a set of recent posts about Peter’s books . What came next was the biggest surprise of all; Peter Reynolds commented on her students’ posts! the students and the teacher were jumping up and down with excitement. What a fabulous way to understand the power of a larger audience.

It’s been great to have more and more positive examples of how our younger students can and do achieve a lot with digital tools.

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Post 20 on the TeachThought 30-Day Blogging ChallengeHow do you curate student work–or help them do it themselves?


 

spinningThe prompt for this post has my head spinning in a variety of directions. I’ll share some examples of how I curate student work in my role as Technology Integration Specialist. I also have ideas for what I’d do if I were a classroom teacher.

We have carts of shared iPads in our two school buildings. Students create a variety of projects that they then want to share with others. We created YouTube accounts for the carts and use the YouTube channels as a location to upload and store video-based projects. From there, students can get the link or embed code to share their projects with others in blogs or via email.

Last year we did an integrated project around the time of the Olympics. Students created short videos and then linked to them using the Aurasma app and augmented reality. That was tons of fun and a new way to share our learning. I wrote about that here.

If I were a classroom teacher, I’d definitely suggest that students share their work via their own blogs. It’s a perfect place to curate and share, as well as receive feedback and comments from others. Another tool that would be highly effective for curating and sharing their work would be ePortfolios. We have a few teams exploring different models and tools for ePortfolios this year and I am excited to with them and support that effort.

Finally, the arrival of Google Classroom has positively impacted how teachers and students curate work. I’ve already received very positive feedback from teachers using Classroom and from parents as well. I look forward to seeing how it evolves.


 

Image: creative commons licensed (BY-NC-ND) flickr photo by krissen: http://flickr.com/photos/krissen/8689944802

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Post 19 in the TeachThought 30-Day Blogging ChallengeName three powerful tools/strategies students can use to reflect on their learning, then discuss closely the one you use most often.


 

 

reflectionStudent reflection is integral in the learning process. It helps them dig into the ‘why’ of learning. It helps them connect learning to other aspects of their lives. Reflecting on their learning using digital tools affords students with the opportunity to share to a larger audience, gives them all a voice, and recognizes their contributions.

Blogging: Regardless of the platform (our teachers are using Kidblog and Weebly), blogging is a fabulous tool. I like how it’s not content-specific. It’s not just a writing tool. Students can blog about any aspect of the curriculum, any portion of their day, and use it for reflection. The ability to comment and provide feedback for one another is critical to the process. Our schools set a goal a few years ago that I wrote about here. The goal was: Using technology as a learning tool, students will share and communicate learning with others within and beyond their classroom walls. Many teachers found blogging to be an ideal tool to support these efforts.

Exit Cards: I’d suggest Padlet as a tool to use for exit cards. It provides quick and instant feedback in a nice, visual manner. Teachers and students have used Padlet in a variety of ways, not only for feedback and reflection.

Backchannels: We have had a number of teachers at various grade levels use TodaysMeet for backchanneling. (There are other tools for this as well.) It helps those who often wouldn’t participate feel comfortable doing so and expressing themselves safely. They reflect, ask questions, voice their opinion, or share their perspective.

 

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