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Posts Tagged ‘digcit’

A real-life lesson in digital citizenship happened recently. Our wonderful physical education teachers have an annual event with third and fourth grade classes. For two weeks, students learn a dance, choreographed and taught to them by middle school students. It’s usually set to popular music, which is incredibly motivating and engaging.

To culminate the learning, there’s an annual Dance-A-Rama, where all of the classes present their dance to one another. As a surprise at the end, (though since we’ve been doing this for about 6 years now, it can’t be a surprise anymore), most of the classroom teachers, student teachers, and other adults present a dance they’ve learned to the students. Oh, and did I mention there are judges, like American Idol? They’re also adults from the school, dressed up and acting the role of pop stars.

BLOCKED!I was asked to help record the event on video. Here’s where it gets interesting. Over the years, I have explored many different ways to record and stream video. We now live stream the annual faculty-student basketball game, PTO meetings, special events, and 8th grade graduation in June. This time I decided to stream it via YouTube Live, so that we could access the video easily afterward.

All went well, until the afterward part. It saved the video beautifully. However, due to the popular songs used for the dances, YouTube blocked it. Most of the songs were monetized, which meant there would be ads on the video. That’s not a problem. But one song was totally blocked in the USA and 7 other countries. I was the only one who could see it!

I tried to download it, but that feature wasn’t available due to never having uploaded it. The video was generated from a live stream. I tried to appeal some of the copyright issues, but was denied. I was ready to throw up my hands and admit defeat.

In the midst of this, I put out a tweet about my predicament. One response was from someone here in Vermont who I have not yet had the pleasure of meeting. Tom (@ACSD_edtech) offered a website where I should have been able to paste the YouTube link and download it,  but that didn’t work. The next thing I knew, he contacted me with a link to the downloaded video saved in Google Drive. Yay!

He sent a tweet saying this: “I used a VPN pinged off another country. It let me watch the video. Once I could do that, I could download it.” That was beyond my knowledge, but it worked and now we’ve been able to share the video internally.

Lessons learned:

  • Classroom teachers are using this as a real-life lesson to help students learn about copyright and music.
  • We will use a different route for live-streaming if there’s going to be music playing on the video, unless we compose the music! YouTube is amazingly powerful and easily catches popular music.
  • YouTube Live was great for streaming.
  • For me, it’s a real-life example of the power of my PLN. I was so impressed by how Tom used his own time to help me solve a problem. We’ll meet at a local conference in a few weeks where I can thank him in person.

I’m not putting the video here as a nod to the privacy of our students and teachers, and respecting the copyright of the music. But it is great that we can share it internally.

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Over the past few weeks I’ve had a few opportunities to facilitate conversations around Digital Citizenship. In addition to the great discussion and new insight from educators and parents, we also did our best to focus on the positive. Talking about Digital Citizenship, whether with adults or students, tends to go to the negative – all of the bad things that could happen or do happen. It’s time to make a shift.

digcitkids-question

DigCitKids

I have been influenced by the positive nature of DigCitKids – a site created by a student, for students. Curran Dee is speaking nationally and engaging kids and adults in the conversation. He’s definitely got me thinking and in my work with students, I’m engaging them in this positive conversation as well.

VermontFest

I led an immersive session at Vita-Learn’s VermontFest conference earlier this month.Vita-Learn is Vermont’s ISTE affiliate and this is one of two conferences offered here in Vermont annually.

Near the end, participants shared their ideas for a positive approach to Digital Citizenship. Here are a few of the ideas:

  • Do a project around DigCit where students have a voice.
  • Examine current practice and consider how to end each lesson more positively
  • Build community.
  • Encourage a growth mindset toward technology with teachers and students.
  • Showcase and share positive examples with a wider audience.
  • Use the design thinking process with students and pose a question about positive technology use
  • Produce PSAs
  • Pay it forward

Parent Presentation

Last week, I had the opportunity to continue this discussion, but this time with parents in our community. I utilized many of Common Sense’s resources for parents, and we had a great conversation. There’s agreement all around that our focus should be on positive, responsible use of digital tools rather than the potentially scary or negative connotations often associated with the topic. Parents had an open mind and were eager to give and receive tips and advice about parenting in this digital age.

Putting It Into Action

Here in our schools, we’re being pro-active. Many of our classrooms Kindergarten-8th grade are integrating digital citizenship lessons, activities, or conversations into their work with students. I shared one example in this post recently. We are now in the process of applying for Digital Citizenship Certified School status and after that, we’ll strive to be Digital Citizenship Certified District. Want to do that yourself? Learn more here!

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