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Posts Tagged ‘leadership’

Post 15 on the 30-Day Blogging ChallengeName 5 strengths you have as an educator.

I’m halfway there!


 

I’ve come up with these 5 terms to describe myself. I wonder if colleagues or friends would think otherwise.

strengths

Passionate: I genuinely enjoy what I do and am passionate about education, technology, and the integration of the two.

Life-long learner: I love to learn. I am thankful for my PLN which helps me grow, see things from different perspectives, and learn more every day.

Hard-working: Because I like what I do, I find it easier to immerse myself in it. Time truly does fly! I imagine some in our schools wonder what I do all day as I used to with my predecessor. No one works harder than a classroom teacher; I’ll be the first to say that. But that doesn’t mean I don’t work hard. I do.

 Leader: Seven years ago I turned in my professional development plan for the next 7 years. (It’s time for my license renewal!) One goal was to take on more of a leadership role with technology. Needless to say, that happened. I find myself taking on more leadership opportunities and welcome the chance to work with and lead others.

Fun: I had to lighten it up a bit! I am more fun than some realize, though my children would beg to differ. It’s all about relationships, right? I spend a lot of time trying to build relationships. I wish others would do the same with me. They might like what they find.

 

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Two big ideas converged yesterday for me. I’m a member of our school district’s Program Council, a leadership team that represents all aspects of our schools. I’m also devoted to expanding my Personal Learning Network (PLN) and the professional learning communities with which I interact and learn.

We have a Program Council meeting coming up this week and one topic is Adopting Effective Educational Practices. The Program Council is working on the task of outlining our thoughts to present to our administrators and school board. Fortunately, our administrators are open to change from within. Best Practices in Math as well as Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS) are recent practices we’ve adopted as a district.

Some ideas that have come up in preparation for the Program Council meeting this week include:

  • An important part of adopting any new practice is the follow-through that occurs after initial implementation
  • Think about how adopting a practice will look from multiple angles
  • Who decides that we’re going to adopt another effective educational practice? With input from whom?
  • How will this impact teachers and their work? More work, enhanced work with students, etc.
  • How long will it take for the implementation of this practice? How will we know we’re there?
  • How does the process begin? Do we start with an initial ‘pilot’ group and then expand?
  • How do we get buy-in?
  • When do we stop adopting new practices and focus on what is happening now?

There’s very little out there on the ‘net about adopting effective practices. I’ve put questions out on Twitter and have not heard much. Who else has done this and what are the things you’ve encountered?

Here’s where my thinking converged. Yesterday, I saw a tweet on Twitter from @engaginged with a link to a post. The topic: Should building a Personal Learning Network (PLN) be required? Of course, I vote YES. From reading recent posts on this blog, it’s evident that I feel strongly that PLNs have a positive impact on teachers and learners of all ages. As Sheryl Nussbaum-Beach says, “None of us is as smart as all of us.”

Why shouldn‘t this be the next practice we adopt?

Our district’s initial task isn’t to pick another practice to adopt, yet it’s always on the horizon. Has anyone moved forward with establishing PLNs as an example of adopting a practice schoolwide?

I look forward to hearing input from others – both in the Program Council community as well as the larger networked community that reads this post.

Image credit: Creative Commons/flickr   http://flic.kr/p/2PRN1v

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